Privileged AF


I'm privileged AF. I know; because I never have to think about the fact. I know; because privilege makes you blind to it. I know, because today, I'm using my fingers to write this blog. Earlier, I walked up a flight of steps to go print something on the copy machine, and I heard my phone ring, when my husband called from the road. I'm an able-bodied, heterosexual, privileged black woman. Let that sink in.

When I have pictures of my husband on my phone, I don't ever worry that I'm going to be judged if somebody sees it pop up on my screen. When I buy books about marriage, I don't have to wonder if there's going to be a story that relates to me. When I go to the grocery store, I can hold his hand and not worry about being looked at funny.

I am privileged AF. I am a privileged heterosexual able-bodied black woman. I've been thinking about what I can do about this, and the reality is that my blindness to my privilege has kept me from paying attention to the way that I've moved through the world. Being able-bodied and heterosexual doesn't mean I've had an easy life; because let's not forget, I am a black woman.

But still, how much time do I actually spend thinking about the privilege I move through this world with? How do I use that privilege for the sake of those who might not be able to climb that flight of stairs, or hear the phone ring, or have a picture of their spouse on their desk? How often do I take the time to think about what life is like for them?

I'm challenging myself to begin to, not only think about this reality, but to do something about it. What I'll do, I don't know; but I know it can't stop at a blog post.

I'm privileged AF. You are too.

What are you gonna do with it?

Contact Info

732 Eden Way North,

STE. E #216, Chesapeake VA 23320

757-410-0839

info@subcstudents.com

Follow Us

  • Facebook - White Circle
  • Twitter - White Circle
  • Instagram - White Circle

A digital content and resource library for students curated by Sub:Culture Incorporated.

>> learn more